spunktitud3

Musings on Travel, Fashion & Fun


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Photography – How does your sunrise look like?

Kota Kinabalu Sunrise from Gaya Island

I dreamt of a Kinabalu Sunrise
I loved the beautiful naturalistic landscape of Gaya Island so much, the image of the sun slowly climbing up Kota Kinabalu in the morning still remains fresh in my mind. I dreamt of it last night, and it seemed so surreal…the gorgeous sun, mountainous landscape, dramatic skies, therapeutic sounds of sea waves, well-complimented with the happy chirping of birds and inquisitive monkeys.

Singapore Sunrise

Singapore’s Urban Sunrise
And this is the urban jungle I wake up to every morning – concrete mountains of flats, metal cranes building more concrete nests, school bells chiming and the roar of vehicles. The upside? No mosquitoes and air-con! LOL


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Gilman Barracks: Asia’s new contemporary arts enclave?

Gilman Barracks

Gilman Barracks

I recently popped by the opening of Gilman Barracks in mid-Sep, Singapore’s latest art and lifestyle enclave housed in refurbished buildings set amongst tropical greenery that were formerly British military barracks dating back to the 1930s and most recently Gilman Village, a F&B cluster popular for its tranquil ambience and colonial feel.

The S$10 million 6.4 hectre development is envisioned as a one-stop destination for quality contemporary art from across Asia, and will provide about 4,200 sqm for art galleries when completed, along with another 4,800 sqm of space dedicated to arts-related activities such as artist studios, an art research center (Centre for Contemporary Art led by Nanyang Technological University) which will focus on artist residencies, research and exhibitions in addition to dining establishments. Gillman Barracks is jointly developed by Singapore government agencies in a bid to enhance Singapore’s standing as an Asian contemporary arts hub.

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Opening Night

The art galleries pulled out all the stops for their opening shows, and among the luminaries who were at the opening night were Japanese pop artists Yoshitomo Nara and Hiroshi Sugito, Chinese painter Zhang Enli, Filipino installation artists Alfredo and Isabel Aquilizan flown in by their representing galleries. Among the most expensive pieces seen were Painter & Model by Pablo Picasso priced at 4.2 million euros (S$6.7million) at Partners & Mucciaccia gallery; Miss Highland by cult artist Yoshitomo Nara (price undisclosed) at Tomio Koyama Gallery; and paintings and sculptures by Yayoi Kusama priced between US$285,000 and US$345,000 (S$348,000 and S$421,000) at Ota Fine Arts.

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Brotherhood of Man by Tang Da Wu at FOST Gallery

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Love her feathered sling bag & bright smile!

Gilman Barracks Singapore

FOST Gallery

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Video Installation by Joo Choon Lin

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Photos by Joo Choon Lin

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Titled in homage to the late Cuban-American artist Félix González-Torres (who named all of his works ‘Untitled’, followed by a parenthetical subtitle), as well as referencing Singapore’s ranking on 2012’s Happy Planet Index, visitors are invited to take a happy badge home.

Gilman Barracks Singapore

My friend’s restaurant. There are two other dining spots there – The Naked Finn and Timbre@Gilman.

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Masons

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Gilman Barracks Singapore

The location is definitely beautiful, but my friends and I felt that the galleries were a bit too spread out, so one may lose the feel of art shopping after a while. A useful tip when visiting – wear comfortable shoes (I brought home two blisters as souvenirs). It’s a nice, tranquil place to chill out though, that you may lose sense of being in Singapore. I can imagine coming here with my date or simply chilling over drinks with my girlfriends.

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Love the building

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Michael Janssen Gallery, one of the more interesting and colourful galleries

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Art is not always high-brow. It can be accessible and hilarious.

Gilman Barracks Singapore

The former British colonial army barracks have cavernous rooms and high ceilings, making the buildings ideal for displaying art. I had a sudden urge to get my ceilings painted too.

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Special commission by Heman Chong. As part of its opening exhibition (now till 30 Nov 2012), various spots at Gilman Barracks have been adorned with artworks by 16 local and international artists such as Heman Chong, Vertical Submarine, Donna Ong, Yayoi Kusama (Japan), Jang Min-Seung & Jung Jaeil (Korea), Yu Ji (China), etc. that highlight its unique environment.Weekend Walking Tour of Gilman Barrack – Chronicling the Contemporary & Historical
Now – 11 November 2012; Free for public
TOUR A: 11.00am till 12.30pm; TOUR B: 4.00pm till 5.30pm
Meeting Point: Entrance of Block 1
Weekday tours available on an ad hoc basis (minimum 10 persons required).
Register for tours: +65 6873 9505 | enquiries@artoutreachprogram.org
Tours provide a comprehensive introduction to Gillman Barracks as a premier contemporary art destination. Tour participants will visit a selection of galleries where art pieces that best articulate key themes and issues on contemporary art will be presented and discussed. The tour will also introduce various art disciplines and practices at Gillman Barracks: creation, curation, exhibition and study. The history, architecture and cultural value of the Gillman Barracks site will also be presented during the tour.

Gilman Barracks Singapore

These are pretty interesting – they are carved from steel

Gilman Barracks Singapore

Yo, what’s up Gandhi? *wink*

With Art Stage, Affordable Art Fair and now, Gilman Barracks established, it would be interesting to see how the art world responds to Singapore as Asia’s contemporary arts hub. It’s great to see how the government is beginning to take a serious stance towards the arts and livening up the Singapore arts scene with many art-related events such as the Night Festival, Children’s Season, Museum Open House, etc. as well as interesting public art. So even if you are not an art buyer, there’s always an arty-farty in all of us who will enjoy the (free) art around.

Gillman Barracks
9 Lock Rd
Singapore 108937
Website: www.gillmanbarracks.com
Opening Hours:
Mon & Public Holidays: Closed
Tues to Sat: 11:00AM to 8:00PM
Sun: 10:00AM to 6:00PM

How to get there
Nearest Train: Labrador Park
Nearest Bus Stop: Opposite Alexandra Point (Buses 51, 57, 61, 93, 97, 97e, 100, 166, 175, 408, 963 or 963e)
By car: Turn in via Malan Road


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Chinese School Lessons: The Day I went back to School

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Me and artist/Filmmaker Green Zeng
When I heard the gallery will be converted into a temporary classroom, I couldn’t pass up the chance to come as a schoolgirl and be part of the exhibits. LOL

In his latest solo show, Singaporean artist & filmmaker Green Zeng continues his examination of the construction and manipulation of history through a series of artworks inspired by Chinese school student activism of pre-and post-Independent Singapore and the educational reforms affecting Chinese schools.

Presenting a series of blackboards covered with silk-screened images of Chinese school uniforms, painted flags and texts in English, Chinese, and Malay, Zeng transforms the gallery into a temporary classroom and invites the viewer to join in a lesson discussing the changes in Chinese education and the struggle to retain one’s cultural and historical roots amidst the building of a new nation.

Chinese School Lessons
Solo exhibition by Green Zeng
27th September to 18th October 2012
Chan Hampe Galleries
Raffles Hotel Shopping Arcade #01-20/21
328 North Bridge Road, Singapore 188719
Tel: +65 6338 1962
Open daily 11:00AM – 7:00PM


About Green Zeng

Born in 1972 in Singapore and educated at LASALLE College of the Arts, Green Zeng is a multi-disciplinary artist whose works encompass visual arts, theatre and film. Zeng’s practice revolves principally around Singaporean life, as well as issues that relate to history and society. He was a member of the experimental company Metabolic Theatre Laboratory, performing with the group in Singapore and Japan. He is currently the creative director of Singapore film production company Mirtillo Films, which he co-founded. He has directed many short films, some of which have been selected for international festivals including the Cannes Film Festival. His film Passenger was awarded the Encouragement Prize at the Akira Kurosawa Memorial Short Film Competition in Tokyo in 2006.

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Chinese school education was characterized by the teaching of ideals and ideology through school mottos, slogans, anthems, and idioms.

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Chinese idiom “近朱者赤|近墨者黑”
Literal translation – one who nears vermilion becomes red and one who nears ink becomes black
Meaning – One takes on the color of one’s company

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

The use of three languages (English, Chinese & Malay) points to the important role that language plays in forming cultural and national identity.

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

The exhibition catalogue came in the form of an exercise book.

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

I think I can still pass off as a student huh…maybe Elementary/Primary 20 :D

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Student movement in postwar Singapore was a sensitive issue because of its political implications. Those who took part of protests during the 1950s and early 1960s were mainly Chinese middle school students and supporters in Chinese education circles who resisted the British colonial rule and the emphasis placed on the English language. This eventually led to the National Service Riots on 13 May 1954 led by the Chinese Middle School students.

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

The uniform depicted here is Chung Cheng High School, which was the main site of the riot in 1954.

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

自强不息,李求上进 – To thrive in adversity, to strive and improve oneself constantly

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Green, me & Ben
Playful Ben was quite happy with my cameo appearance, while I thought Green was a bit astonished by my ‘costume’, haha

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Shoes – Feiyue
White Shirt – Ralph Lauren
Blue Silk Skirt – Mum’s vintage Cacharel
Blue/green tartan ribbon pin – From a flea market

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

温故知新 – To gain new knowledge by reviewing old; to understand the present by reviewing the past.

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

That’s the big question – the search for identity

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Chinese School Lessons by Green Zeng

Fajar – the glorious dawn in Malay


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Vincent Leow: Resembling Imaginary Creatures

vincent leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Vincent Leow – Resembling Imaginary Creatures

I popped by my friend Ben’s art gallery for Vincent Leow’s latest art exhibition opening. I was quite looking forward to the show cos’ Vincent the “enfant terrible” of the Singapore art community is a pivotal figure in the alternative contemporary art scene in Singapore. His multi-discipline art is nothing short of thought-provoking – it has been known primarily for the provocative and aggressive which continually explores issues of identity, memory, mortality and its legacies. To me, he is definitely the Jean Paul-Gaultier of the Singapore art scene. One of his more memorable artworks for me would be his recent man-dog silver sculptures Andy – based on his black mongrel and named after Andy Warhol – which were exhibited at the Singapore Art Museum as part of an exhibition.

Vincent Leow: Resembling Imaginary Creatures
27 July to 21 August 2012
Download the exhibition catalogue
Chan Hampe Galleries
Raffles Shopping Arcade
328 North Bridge Road
Singapore 188719

vincent leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Danger Dragon
Oil on Canvas
122 x 153 cm, 1996

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Vincent Leow – Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Vincent Leow – Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

King Fisher
Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm, 2012

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Vincent Leow – Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Me with the ever-happy Ben

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Grey Pig
Oil on Canvas, 120 x 150 cm, 2012

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Red Bird
Oil on canvas, 120 x 150 cm, 2012

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Black Gold
Wood cut, 76 x 110 cm, Edition of 10, 2009

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Me and David – he’s also the curator for Vincent Leow’s exhibition “Tags & Treats”

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Head (Yellow Spots), Head (Blue),
Head (Green Spots), Head (Brown Spots)
Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm, 2012

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Smoking Gnome, Red Man with Blue Pipe
Smoking Old Man, Gnome with Extended Nose
Oil on canvas, 40 x 50 cm, 2012

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Red Fish
Mix Medium on Canvas
90 x 120 cm, 1994

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Me and Vincent – he’s so gentle and unassuming, so unlike the “enfant terrible” moniker!

About Vincent Leow
Singapore’s leading contemporary artist Vincent Leow (b. 1961) Celebrated as an enfant terrible of the Singapore art community, Vincent Leow is a pivotal figure in the alternative art scene in Singapore. His practice parallels the development of contemporary art in Singapore; and as a painter, he is regarded as a remarkable imagist who has dipped into an astonishing range of images from popular culture, literature, cinema, politics and the mass media.

Leow stands as a central figure in the history of the ‘art collective’ in Singapore. One of the early members of The Artists Village (TAV) , founded in 1988 by the iconic Tang Dawu (b 1943), Leow subsequently helmed other artist-run spaces. Co-founding Utopia (now defunct), Leow is also the founder of Plastique Kinetic Worms (PKW), a leading alternative artist-run space in Singapore. He was also selected to represent Singapore at the 2007 Venice Biennale.

Engaging a range of media that has manifested in performances, installations, sculptures, digital and mixed-media works, Leow’s practice has maintained the element of anarchy and rebellion so critical to alternative practices. He acquired public notoriety with his 1992 performance in which he drank his own urine, and another dressing up in a suit made of fake dollar bills. The art gesture was later elaborated upon through the packing and sale of bottles of urine – epitomizing Leow’s artful handling of ‘underground, subversive’ practices with a savvy understanding of the mechanics of market consumption and its desire for and absorption of infamy, scandal and controversy.

His earlier paintings formed the emergence of unapologetic aggression, blatant sexuality and emotional temperament in the field of painting in Singapore. Leow’s later paintings assumed several shifts, particularly during and after his art studies in the USA (1991) on several art scholarships.

Some of Leow’s works in the 1990s were marked by an ‘urban street style’ and arguably of Neo-Surrealism; others carry a Pop-art sensibility, a taste for kitsch and always a highly individual visual vocabulary – prompting art writers to describe his practice as epitomizing ‘post-modern’ visual strategies.

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Look of the Day
Top – Celine
Velvet floral skirt – Yohji Yamamoto

Vincent Leow - Resembling Imaginary Creatures

Look of the Day
Necklace – Own design
Bangle – Vuitton; Bracelets – Forever 21
Bag – Balenciaga
Shoes with netting – From Hong Kong