spunktitud3

Musings on Travel, Fashion & Fun

Otterly Cute

Leave a comment

Otters FeedingWas on my morning walk when I caught sight of a family of otters feeding on a huge fish – the little rascals had stolen a fish from the nearby fishing pond and dragged it to the adjacent river to for their feast. I have heard them stealing koi from ponds too, that must be their equivalent of fine dining lol. They are pretty noisy eaters!


Leave a comment

Botswana – The Little Mousey who would be Shrew

Elephant ShrewMe: Oh, so this little mouse-like creature is called a Sandshrew?
My pal Kai: Err, it is actually called an Elephant Shrew. Sandshrew only exists in Pokemon Go.
Me: Oopsie! :p
Confessions of a Pokemon Go-holic” at Mamagua, Mashatu Game Reserve in Botswana

The elephant shrew (also called sengis) are represented by a single family, the Macroscelididae, with all 19 living species found exclusively in Africa. The cute little mammal gets its name from the long, pointed head and very long and mobile trunk-like snout. While they look like mice, the elephant shrew is more closely related to a group of African great mammals that includes elephants, sea cows, and aardvarks.

Smaller elephant shrew species like this one are found in the uplands of Southern, Eastern, and Northwestern Africa in dry forests, scrub, savannas, and open country covered by sparse shrubs of grass, while the larger four species of giant elephant shrew prefer to live in forests, closed-canopy woodlands and thickets usually in a nest made of leaf litter. The elephant shrew eats invertebrates like ants, termites, beetles, spiders, millipedes, and worms.

Elephant shrews are monogamous (yay! proud of you) and mate for life. They give birth 4 to 5 times a year. Highly territorial, they stake an area spanning a few acres. When other shrews enroach its territory, the elephant shrew behaves true to its name – they will waste no time in screaming, kicking and sparring – like a human shrew – to drive the trepasser away.

The couple do not hang out together all the time though – they go about on their own looking for food, using sent-marking to let its mate know it is still around and not gallavanting elsewhere. This musky smell also serves as a deterrent against predators such as birds of prey and snakes, as well as help to point our food sources.

The elephant shrew has been listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, with the loss of its habitat to urbanization being the biggest threat to their survival. Help conserve the elephant shrew.


Leave a comment

Photo of the Day – Margaret River’s Wild Roos

Wild Kangaroos in Perth
Caught this pair of wild kangaroos at Gunyulgup Drive in Margaret River, Perth. Apparently, everyday at around 5am and 5pm you can see HUNDREDS of wild kangaroos at the empty green space near Little Fish Restaurant. Apparently, the roos hang out at rural golf courses around the area as well (Vines Golf Course, Margaret River Golf Club, Melville Glades Golf Club, Yanchep Golf Course, etc). Another ‘interesting’ place to see them would be Pinnaroo Valley Memorial Park (yes a cemetery). It’s definitely a must-see when you visit Margaret River :) Be careful of them if you are driving, as they are well-know to be ‘road hogs’ or may just suddenly jump out to cross the road.

Other places that you can try are Yelverton Brooks, Whiteman Park and Cottonwood Reserve (off Dianella Drive and Gay Street by Chanel 9 and Chanel 7 TV studios). Do you know of more kangaroo sighting places in Perth or Australia?

Save